Why Dance is Good for You? 

t has been recognized for a long time that real activity –including dancing and exercises- can have numerous positive effects on people’s bodies and minds, commencing to better cardiovascular health, fewer migraine headaches, and a more energetic brain.

Dance is not merely physical in many ways, it also requires a lot of mental effort.

Many characters who dread exercising are more prone to use dancing as a way of overall physical improvement. While most exercises serve to use repetitive actions that many find boring, dancing uses a wide variety of movements and has the extra advantage of social communication with different people. As a result, it can provide greater self-confidence and self-esteem, enhance a usual sense of well-being, and lead to more active social relationships.

Symptoms

Dancing has also proven to be therapeutic for those living with Parkinson’s. It can help alleviate some of the motor symptoms associated with Parkinson’s such as stiffness, tremors, impaired balance, and coordination. Dance can even help improve their gait.

●Dancing Works Up a Sweat
●Improves Balance and Coordination
●It’s an Instant Mood Enhancer
●It Helps to Build Strength
●It Keeps You Mentally Sharp
●It’s a Mental Escape
●It Helps With Social Anxiety

You appear to get a much larger discharge of endorphins when you dance than during other forms of exercise; it also connects with the emotional centers in the brain. For many people, dancing prompts an emotional release – often that’s uncomplicated comfort, while for some it can make them cry

Dancing also develops spatial awareness, as well as raising the heart rate and causing a discharge of feel-good endorphins into the bloodstream. One more benefit is that it helps reduce levels of cortisol – a stress hormone.

Modern living often gives us feeling disconnected from our bodies because we spend so much time lying down and hooked up to technology. Dancing makes you feel good because it makes you feel so alive

Modern living often gives us feeling disconnected from our bodies because we spend so much time lying down and hooked up to technology. Dancing makes you feel good because it makes you feel so alive

Dancing also seems to strengthen social bonding and what psychologists call “self-other merging.” Like chatting with a stranger and finding out you both visited the same school or grew up in the same neighborhood, moving and grooving in rhythm with others lights up brain pathways that blur the barriers your mind erects between yourself and a stranger, and so helps you feel a sense of connection and sameness

 

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